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Caroline McCaul Follows in the Footsteps of her Texas Family

The leading institution of the University System of Texas, the University of Texas at Austin, is known colloquially as a “Public Ivy”. Currently UT Austin, located only 1 mile from the Texas State Capitol building in Austin, has the 5th largest campus enrollment in the U.S., in excess of 50,000 students, with approximately 24,000 staff members and instructors. “Public Ivy” is a moniker reserved for those public universities regarded as providing a quality of education on a par with Ivy League schools such as Harvard and Princeton. Caroline McCaul, high school senior at Westlake High School in Austin, has decided upon UT Austin for her next phase of academic achievement, following in the footsteps of her maternal and paternal grandmothers, her paternal grandfather, and an uncle, all of whom graduated from this prestigious university.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

The University of Texas at Austin originated in a constitutional promise by the Mexican government in 1827 to establish an arts and sciences public education program. When Texas attained independence from Mexico, the new Texas Congress made provision for a general system of education, in 1836. Again, in 1838, a special committee of the Texas Congress presented an “Act to Establish the University of Texas”. In 1839, the Congress of Texas decided to set aside 288,000 acres for a university, with 40 acres of that to be designated as College Hill. When Texas became part of the United States, the Constitution of Texas of 1845 did not mention higher education. Caroline McCaul would have a family legacy at University of Texas at Austin, but first the Texas legislators of 150 years ago would have to fight for it.

 
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Posted by on October 2, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Caroline McCaul: The Importance of Extracurricular Activities on College Applications

High school students who want to get into college may find it more difficult to get into the school of their choice without an extensive list of extracurricular activities on their resume. This is because, as has been the case for decades, college admissions officers are looking for students who go above and beyond the call of duty for their schoolwork. Earning good grades and testing well is important, of course, but colleges are looking for students who can perform well in often rigid classroom setting and in their communities as well. Following instructions and turning assignments in on time shows responsibility, but participating in sports, community service organizations, and clubs, shows a commitment to the community that goes beyond academic excellence. It also shows a great deal of leadership qualities and talents beyond the classroom.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

College admissions boards look for multi-talented individuals for their school. Colleges are constantly competing with each other for the best students so that they can showcase their excellent facilities and opportunities, which will attract more students and more tuition money. Participating in sports and clubs shows colleges that you aren’t afraid of more work, more responsibility, and that you aren’t afraid to put your talents to the test. Colleges want students who take risks and try new things. Participating in extracurricular activities can also help make up for a few sub-par grades or test scores that students may be stressed about on their college admissions forms. While participation in extracurricular activities won’t save ones chances if a student has poor grades all around, it could be the difference between getting in and getting a rejection letter.

Caroline McCaul was accepted into the University of Texas because of her stellar grades, test scores, and her long list of extracurricular activities she participated in throughout her high school career.

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Working in Radio – More than a Smooth Voice by Caroline McCaul

Working for a radio station requires more than a smooth on-air voice. In order to fully complete all necessary functions to consistently air quality audio content, you have to be well-versed in audio editing, fact-checking, research, and many other skills. You may have to write and rehearse content before you go on the air to read. Depending on your duties at a radio station, you may not even speak on the air. Many radio professionals have built long and distinguished careers out of working behind the scenes for on-air talent. Producers, for example, are responsible for ensuring that all radio broadcast content is solid before anyone touches a microphone.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

Starting in radio usually means starting at the bottom. Many radio station professionals start as interns who research content, edit audio files, help news anchors with stories and do whatever is necessary to consistently produce excellent programming, no matter what kind of content it is. Radio interns are typically responsible for filling in the cracks of their superiors, making sure that nothing is forgotten. Over time, these interns develop enough skills to handle more responsibilities, and a new radio career is born. Radio crews need multi-talented individuals who can handle the stress of being on a deadline and feeling the pressure from their audience to provide them with excellent content on a regular basis. Gaining the experience needed to have a successful career in radio is crucial. Many radio professionals started as interns or volunteers at community radio stations.

Caroline McCaul is a student at the University of Texas in Austin. She graduated from Westlake High School in Austin in 2015, and successfully completed a radio internship with Clear Channel

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Caroline McCaul – Guitar and Voice

Caroline McCaul is a recent graduate of Westlake High School in Austin, Texas, where she was a member of the National Honor Society for High School Scholars and racked up a 99.3 weighted Grade Point Average.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

“I have a unique ability that combines a giving and sensitive heart with a keen intellect and a love of music that will make me successful,” she says. She pursued her interest in music throughout her high school years, studying voice and guitar at the Strum Music School in Austin. The instructors at Strum bring out the best in their students by focusing on each one’s unique interests and goals, and by creating a comfortable and relaxed environment in which to learn.
But there is no substitute for the hours of practice necessary to master any musical instrument. Playing guitar and singing, as Caroline McCaul does, has the added challenge of combining two disciplines that must be done simultaneously, and seamlessly. In order to do it right the musician must unite strumming and singing rhythms. Playing and singing may seem like they are separate things, but they are not.

A singer guitarist must first learn the notes and chords of the song they want to play, to the point where it is internalized and it can be played without really thinking about it. They need to learn the melody and lyrics to the song too, and to that same level of familiarity. Both aspects of the song are combined into a single unit.

Caroline McCaul studied voice and guitar with her teachers for four hours a week, and spent many more hours practicing to master the craft.

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Starting a Business: Coming From Ideas by Caroline McCaul

Starting a new business usually involves coming up with a new, better product or method of providing that product. Computers and operating systems existed before Bill Gates started Microsoft, but he knew he could create an operating system that was easier to use and make computers easier to use in general. He came up with his idea, marketed it, and founded one of the largest software companies based on his improvement of computers and their systems. Today he’s one of the richest men in the world. Ideas like this don’t come around very often, but if you’re a skilled worker in an industry that interests you, like Bill Gates was, you can come up with an idea that may not make you a billion dollars, but will at least provide you with a good startup business.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

Bill Gates was an exceptional software coder. He could build on his idea for a new operating system because he had the raw skills to do it himself. He didn’t need to rely on others to make his idea happen. The best ideas for new entrepreneurs are those that you can build upon yourself and create a new product or delivery system that will disrupt the market. In today’s tech-obsessed world, disruption is the name of the game. Gain skills, either with on-the-job training or in school, and you will develop the raw tools you need to create solutions people are willing to pay for.

Caroline McCaul is a freshman at the University of Texas. In high school, McCaul participated in Launchgen, an educational program that promotes new, innovative business ideas. She graduated from Westlake High School in 2015 with honors and completed multiple Advanced Placement courses, such as English, Government, Economics, and more. McCaul participated in many other extracurricular activities that have helped her get into the University of Texas.

 
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Posted by on September 7, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Caroline McCaul – Launchgen Participant

Launchgen is a program that offers high school age students the resources and support they need to become America’s next generation of entrepreneurs.

Caroline McCaul

Caroline McCaul

The first step in that process is to provide schools with the resources they need to offer students a business competition program. Getting business-oriented students involved in hands-on operations in real business situations is a proven way of teaching fundamentals of commerce. The Launchgen program challenges students to think like entrepreneurs, and the knowledge and confidence they get through their participation can launch them into their futures.

Launchgen is about celebrating students who think about business in much the same way star athletes are celebrated. They provide schools with the personal support and the resources they need to host the competition, that will reward them as the innovators and risk-takers that they may well be destined to become.

Participants in the Launchgen competition are taught to identify a need or a want, which is one of the simplest and most practical ways for them to come up with a business idea. By doing so, they are encouraged to think of a solution to that need or want, and then find a way to make it profitable. A tried-and-true method for young entrepreneurs to begin is by considering their own passions and abilities, and then finding a way to leverage them for a profit. Launchgen helps them develop the tools to do so.

Caroline McCaul is a graduate of Westlake High School in Austin, Texas, who is expecting to enter the University of Texas. She participated in Launchgen in the Spring of 2015 to develop her own business start-up.

 
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Posted by on September 5, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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Learning a New Language: Immersion by Caroline McCaul

Immersing yourself in a country that speaks another language can be the quickest way to acclimate yourself to that language, that is, as long as you already possess a strong understanding of the basics. For the quickest way to learn any language, you should practice vocabulary and sentence structure to get the basics of the language down early on. After you understand the basic structure of the language as well as how it works on a sentence level, you can begin to work on better acclimating yourself to that particular culture, and to see the language in action. Watching others interact, and listening to how they speak the language, are a couple of the quickest ways to learn and begin speaking that language fluently.

Most people who learn languages, those they are unfamiliar with, will many times work to interact on a one-on-one basis with people who speak that language regularly. An individual can’t expect to pick up another way of communicating without spending a significant amount of time both learning and preacticing. However, you can’t simply move to another country and expect to pick up the language by walking around outside. Gaining a basic understanding of how the language works on a phonetic level is a great way to use immersion as a way to bolster your knowledge of a language, rather than have immersion be the only way you learn a new language.

Learning Spanish, for example, is much easier if you have a basic working knowledge of how the language works before you move to Mexico. Living with Spanish-speakers for six months or a year is a great way to immerse yourself in the Mexican culture and learn more about the people that speak Spanish in Mexico, but if you don’t know a word of Spanish before you go there, it could be difficult to start from scratch. Give yourself time to understand not only vocabulary, but also sentence structure and the subtle differences between dialects.

Caroline McCaul studied Spanish extensively in high school before she spent a summer in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico to learn to speak Spanish fluently.

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2015 in National Charity League, National Honor Society

 

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